CAROL’S CORNER

Hello out there to all my loyal blog readers. It was a beautiful day here in Central New York. Digging the nicer weather. Today's outfit says it all as I have dubbed it” Spring Has Sprung”. It took long enough though. I love all the colors. It's happy and peaceful at the same time.

Was able to incorporate a few of the colors of my blouse in my FitBit Combo.

I'm going to try and blog today on something a reader asked me about and that is exercise if you have low potassium levels.

I'm going to use something from women.thenest.com. It is titled “What Are The Dangers Of Exercising With Low Potassium Levels”?

Although many people embarking on a fitness routine think primarily in terms of calories, protein, fat, and carbohydrates, minerals play a hugely important role in overall health. Potassium which is found in a large variety of foods, plays a role in the health of your heart, lungs, kidneys, and muscles. Hypokalemia–low potassium levels– can cause health problems and make exercising that much more difficult.

GETTING ENOUGH POTASSIUM

If you're worried you have a potassium deficiency, talk to your doctor before taking vitamins or supplements. Many foods are excellent sources of potassium. Vegetables such as broccoli, potatoes, and summer squash contain large quantities of potassium , as do fruits such as bananas and apricots. Milk , nuts, yogurt , and soy-based products also contain potassium. Some breakfast cereals are fortified with potassium.

WEAKNESS

Potassium enables your body to build new muscle tissue and maintain the health of current muscle tissue. Because exercise taxes your muscles, a common side effect of low potassium during exercise is muscular weakness. You might feel weak and dizzy all over or feel as if your muscles aren't working right. Unusual pain or effort during physical tasks that are usually fairly easy, could indicate a number of health conditions including a potassium deficiency.

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

Potassium plays a role in the regulation of blood pressure by helping the body excrete excess sodium. According to Colorado State University Extension, a diet high in sodium and low in potassium could be a significant contributor to high blood pressure. Exercise tends to raise blood pressure, because the heart has to work harder to pump blood to the organs and muscles; low potassium can elevate blood pressure even more, resulting in dizziness, chest pain, nausea and breathlessness.

ABNORMAL HEART RHYTHMS

Your heart is controlled by a complex electrical system that keeps heartbeats relatively regular and increases your heart rate when your organs and muscles need more blood. Potassium plays a crucial role in regulating the hearts electrical system, and low potassium can cause abnormal heart rhythms, particularly during exercise. You might feel as though your heart skips a beat, adds an extra beat, or beats at an irregular pace.


If you have been told you have low potassium levels, you need to sit down with your health care provider and discuss what you need to do to bring it to a safe level. It might be something as simple as adding certain foods to your diet. If that doesn't work your physician might put you on a potassium supplement. I took potassium supplements for years because of a medication I used to take. I am off that now so I don't need to take potassium supplements at all any more. Low potassium levels are nothing to fool around with because it can cause serious problems if let go long enough. Until you get this situation in control you might want to use an exercise drink with electrolytes while you are attempting exercise. I hope you have found this to be both informative and helpful.

The summer months are fast approaching. Remember to stay hydrated. Be careful in the sun and use sunblock. Now is the time to get in shape. Stay motivated, stay focused, and above all NEVER EVER GIVE UP. Till next time, God Bless.

 

 

 

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